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Vaccine Comparison

Classical Swine Fever Virus DNA Vaccine pcDNA/E2 with TRIF Classical swine fever virus DNA vaccine pCI-gp55 Classical swine fever virus E(rns) mutant vaccine Classical swine fever virus E1 mutant vaccine Classical swine fever virus E1 protein vaccine Classical swine fever virus E2 mutant vaccine Classical swine fever virus vaccine VAC-E0 Classical swine fever virus vaccine VAC-E2 DNA vaccine expressing the E2 protein rAdV-SFV-E2 rORFV-CSFV-E2 rPFV-CSFV-E0
Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004524
  • Type: DNA vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • E2 gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pRK-TRIF (Wan et al., 2010)
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004340
  • Type: DNA vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Pig
  • E2 gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Description: Vector pCI expressed the gp55/E2 gene from classical swine fever virus (CSFV) (Hammond et al., 2001).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pCI (Hammond et al., 2001)
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0002952
  • Type: Live, attenuated vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Pig
  • E(rns) gene engineering:
    • Type: Gene mutation
    • Description: This E(rns) mutant is from Classical swine fever virus (Sainz et al., 2008).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Immunization Route: intranasal immunization
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0002953
  • Type: Live, attenuated vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Pig
  • E1 gene engineering:
  • Immunization Route: intranasal immunization
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0011509
  • Type: Subunit vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Antigen: Classical swine fever virus gp55 encoding E1
  • gp55 gene engineering:
    • Type: Recombinant protein preparation
    • Description: A recombinant virus BacEl[-], which expressed El without a C-terminal TMR, generated a protein that was secreted from the cells. The fraction of this protein that was found to be cell associated had a slightly lower molecular mass (49 to 52 kDa) than wild-type El and remained endo H sensitive. The high-mannose units of the secreted protein were trimmed during transport through the exocytotic pathway to endo H-resistant glycans, resulting in a protein with a lower molecular mass (46 to 48 kDa) (Hulst et al., 1993).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: Baculovirus vector
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0002954
  • Type: Live, attenuated vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Pig
  • E2 gene engineering:
    • Type: Gene mutation
    • Description: This E2 mutant is from Classical swine fever virus (Maurer et al., 2005).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Immunization Route: Oronasal immunization
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0011427
  • Type: Recombinant vector vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Antigen: Classical swine fever virus envelope glycoprotein E0
  • E0 gene engineering:
    • Type: Recombinant vector construction
    • Description: A 0.7-kbp fragment (corresponding to nucleotides 1114 to 1838 of CSFV Alfort Tu¨bingen which encompassed the coding sequence for all but 5 amino acids (aa) of CSFV E0 was isolated from plasmid pHCK11 by digestion with BglI and BanI. The missing codons were substituted for with synthetic adaptor oligonucleotides. The 59 adaptor BBA (59GATCCACCAT GGGGGCCCTGT39) linked the BglI site of the 0.7-kbp fragment to the BamHI site of pGS62 and contained a sequence according to Kozak’s rules. Besides the initial methionine, BBA coded for 3 aa: glycine (not found in the CSFV sequence) and alanine and leucine (corresponding to CSFV aa 250 and 251). The 39 adaptor BEA (59GTGCCTATGCCTGAGTTA39) connected the BanI site of the 0.7-kbp fragment to the EcoRI site of pGS62 and encoded amino acids corresponding to glycine 491 to alanine 494 of CSFV as well as a stop codon. After ligation with adaptors BBA and BEA, the 0.7-kbp fragment was introduced into recombination vector pGS62 to derive plasmid pGS62-E0 (König et al., 1995). To generate a VVR vaccine, CVI cells were infected with vaccinia virus strain WR (VAC-WR) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.05 and after 1 h were transfected with the respective recombination plasmids by using a mammalian transfection kit. After 48 h of incubation, virus progeny was harvested by repeated freezing and thawing. Selection for a thymidine kinase-negative phenotype on human 143tk2 cells was carried out with medium containing 1% agarose and 100 mg of bromodeoxyuridine per ml. VVR were isolated from thymidine kinase negative virus plaques and were plaque purified twice (König et al., 1995).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: Recombinant Vaccinia Virus
  • Immunization Route: Intradermal injection (i.d.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0011508
  • Type: Recombinant vector vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Antigen: Classical swine fever virus E2
  • E2 gene engineering:
    • Type: Recombinant vector construction
    • Description: A 1.5-kbp DNA fragment (representing nucleotides 2433 to 3971 of CSFV Alfort Tu¨bingen) isolated from clone pHCK11 by NheI-HpaI digestion was ligated into plasmid pBR02-16/4. The resulting construct contained the nucleotide sequences for CSFV E2 and PRV-SP. Isolation of the PRV-SP E2 sequence and introduction into vector pGS62 gave rise to pGS62-E2 (König et al., 1995).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: Recombinant Vaccinia Virus
  • Immunization Route: Intradermal injection (i.d.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004514
  • Type: Live, attenuated vaccine
  • Status: Licensed
  • E2 gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pcDNA3.1+ (Tarradas et al., 2011)
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004700
  • Type: Recombinant vector vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species for Licensed Use: Pig
  • Preparation: An adenovirus-vectored Semliki forest virus replicon construct expressing the E2 glycoprotein from CSFV, rAdV-SFV-E2 (Sun et al., 2013).
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004768
  • Type: Recombinant vector vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species for Licensed Use: Baboon
  • E2 gene engineering:
    • Type: Recombinant vector construction
    • Description: Using the new recombinant parapoxvirus (PPV) Orf virus (ORFV) as a vaccine expressing the CSFV E. (Voigt et al., 2007).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Preparation: (Voigt et al., 2007) the recombinant parapoxvirus (PPV) Orf virus (ORFV) as a vaccine expressing the CSFV E2 glycoprotein to protect CSFV chellange.
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004748
  • Type: Recombinant vector vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species for Licensed Use: Baboon
  • Preparation: CSFV E0 gene was amplified from the plasmid pMD18-T-E0 by PCR and cloned into the FPV-P11 and FPV-pSY (Wang et al., 2008).
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response

Mouse Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000286
  • Immune Response: Co-delivery of the DNA vaccine pcDNA/E2 with the TRIF adjuvant enhanced the cellular, not humoral, immune responses induced by DNA vaccines in mice (Wan et al., 2010).
  • Challenge Protocol: All immunized pigs were intramuscularly challenged 2 weeks after the last immunization with 105 TCID50 highly virulent CSFV Shimen strain (Wan et al., 2010).
  • Efficacy: All pigs co-immunized with pcDNA/E2 + pRK-TRIF survived viral challenge., though two pigs in this groups had a slight fever but recovered with 1 or 3 days and the remaining pig in this group had no CSF signs (Wan et al., 2010).

Pig Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Challenge Protocol: All immunized pigs were intramuscularly challenged 2 weeks after the last immunization with 105 TCID50 highly virulent CSFV Shimen strain (Wan et al., 2010).
  • Efficacy: All pigs co-immunized with pcDNA/E2 + pRK-TRIF survived viral challenge., though two pigs in this groups had a slight fever but recovered with 1 or 3 days and the remaining pig in this group had no CSF signs (Wan et al., 2010).

Pig Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000286
  • Efficacy: Following challenge with CSFV, 100% of weaned pigs and 75% pre-weaned piglets were protected from disease (Hammond et al., 2001).

Pig Response

  • Persistence: An E(rns) mutant is attenuated in swine (Sainz et al., 2008).
  • Efficacy: An E(rns) mutant induces protection in swine from challenge with wild type CSVF (Sainz et al., 2008).

Pig Response

Pig Response

  • Vaccination Protocol: Groups of two specific-pathogen-free, 10- to 12-week-old pigs were inoculated intramuscularly with a double water-oil emulsion of immunoaffinity-purified El on day 0. Pigs 1, 2, 3, and 4 were inoculated with 20 ug of El, and pigs 6, 7, 8, and 9 were inoculated with 100 ug of El. After 28 days, pigs 3 and 4 were vaccinated again with 20 ug and pigs 8 and 9 were vaccinated with 100 ug of immunoaffinity-purified El. Pigs 5 and 10 (control pigs) were inoculated on day 0 with a double water-oil emulsion of SF900 medium from Sf21 cells infected with wild-type AcNPV and vaccinated again with the same inoculum on day 28 (Hulst et al., 1993).
  • Challenge Protocol: Pigs of all groups were challenged intranasally on day 42 with 100 50% lethal doses of HCV strain Brescia 456610, a challenge dose that, in unprotected pigs, leads to acute disease characterized by high fever and thrombocytopenia starting at days 3 to 5 and to death at days 7 to 11(Hulst et al., 1993).
  • Efficacy: Intramuscular vaccination of pigs with immunoaffinity-purified E1 (gp55) in a double water-oil emulsion elicited high titers of neutralizing antibodies between 2 and 4 weeks after vaccination at the lowest dose tested (20 micrograms). The vaccinated pigs were completely protected against intranasal challenge with 100 50% lethal doses of HCV (Classical swine fever virus) strain Brescia (Hulst et al., 1993).

Pig Response

  • Persistence: An E2 mutant is attenuated in swine (Maurer et al., 2005).
  • Efficacy: An E2 mutant induced significant protection in swine from challenge with wild type CSFV (Maurer et al., 2005).

Pig Response

  • Vaccination Protocol: Pigs were vaccinated with a single dose of VVR (VAC-E0 or VAC-E2) or control strain VAC-WR by three different routes simultaneously (intradermally, intraperitoneally, and intravenously). A total of 5 x 107 PFU of VVR was given by each route. Clinical reactions after vaccination were monitored by daily examination (König et al., 1995).
  • Challenge Protocol: The pigs were challenged intranasally 5 weeks after immunization with 2 x 107 50% tissue culture infective doses of CSFV Alfort Tu¨bingen. Clinical symptoms were monitored daily. Blood samples were taken at days 5 and 12 postinfection (p.i.) and at the slaughter of the animals (days 12 to 27 p.i.) (König et al., 1995).
  • Efficacy: Swine vaccinated with VVR expressing E0 and/or E2 resisted a lethal challenge infection with CSFV. Glycoprotein E0 represents a second determinant for the induction of protective immunity against classical swine fever (König et al., 1995).

Pig Response

  • Vaccination Protocol: Pigs were vaccinated with a single dose of VVR (VAC-E0 or VAC-E2) or control strain VAC-WR by three different routes simultaneously (intradermally, intraperitoneally, and intravenously). A total of 5 x 107 PFU of VVR was given by each route. Clinical reactions after vaccination were monitored by daily examination (König et al., 1995).
  • Challenge Protocol: The pigs were challenged intranasally 5 weeks after immunization with 2 x 107 50% tissue culture infective doses of CSFV Alfort Tu¨bingen. Clinical symptoms were monitored daily. Blood samples were taken at days 5 and 12 postinfection (p.i.) and at the slaughter of the animals (days 12 to 27 p.i.) (König et al., 1995).
  • Efficacy: Swine vaccinated with VVR expressing E0 and/or E2 resisted a lethal challenge infection with CSFV. Glycoprotein E0 represents a second determinant for the induction of protective immunity against classical swine fever (König et al., 1995).

Pig Response

  • Vaccination Protocol: Groups of 3 pigs were used in each experimental group. Briefly, group 1 (pE2) was inoculated with 500 μg of plasmid pE2 in co-injection with 500 μg of pcDNA3.1 (empty plasmid, Invitrogen), group 2 (pE2 + pCCL20) was inoculated with 500 μg pE2 in co-injection with 500 μg of pCCL20, and the control group was injected with PBS. In all cases, three doses were administered intramuscularly in the neck every 12 days. Before every immunization (at days 0, 12 and 24), pigs were bled to follow the CSFV specific immunoresponse (Tarradas et al., 2011).
  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000286
  • Immune Response: The vaccine is able to increase antibody-mediated responses, while enhancing the T helper cell response associated with the induction of neutralizing antibodies against CSFV (Tarradas et al., 2011).
  • Challenge Protocol: Thirty-six days after the first immunization (pre-challenge), all pigs were challenged with 105 DICT50 of CSFV virulent Margarita strain by i.m. injection in the neck (Tarradas et al., 2011).
  • Efficacy: Immunized animals with E2 DNA vaccine in co-administration with the plasmid containing swine CCL20 developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies against homologous and heterologous CSFV strains, and were totally protected upon a lethal viral challenge (Tarradas et al., 2011).

Pig Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Efficacy: Two immunizations with a dose as low as 6.25×105 TCID(50) or a single immunization with a dose of 107 TCID(50) rAdV-SFV-E2 provided complete protection against a lethal CSFV challenge (Sun et al., 2013).

Pig Response

  • Vaccination Protocol: Pigs were vaccinated with ORFV (Voigt et al., 2007).
  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Challenge Protocol: Pigs were challenged with CSFV (Voigt et al., 2007).
  • Efficacy: Vector virus vaccinated swine were able to cope with the lymphocyte and in particular B-cell depression in peripheral blood after challenge showing no clinical signs and no viremia. Also, the vaccinated swine demonstrated that a single intra-muscular application confers solid protection (Voigt et al., 2007).

Pig Response

  • Vaccination Protocol: Piglets were immunized three times with recombinant Fowlpox virus (Wang et al., 2008).
  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Challenge Protocol: The pigs were challenged with CSFV (Wang et al., 2008).
  • Efficacy: The protection experiment showed that 75% of piglets immunized three times with recombinant Fowlpox virus were survived, indicating that the recombinant Fowlpox virus was effective (Wang et al., 2008).
References References References References References References References References References References References References
Wan et al., 2010: Wan C, Yi L, Yang Z, Yang J, Shao H, Zhang C, Pan Z. The Toll-like receptor adaptor molecule TRIF enhances DNA vaccination against classical swine fever. Veterinary immunology and immunopathology. 2010; 137(1-2); 47-53. [PubMed: 20466439].
Hammond et al., 2001: Hammond JM, Jansen ES, Morrissy CJ, Goff WV, Meehan GC, Williamson MM, Lenghaus C, Sproat KW, Andrew ME, Coupar BE, Johnson MA. A prime-boost vaccination strategy using naked DNA followed by recombinant porcine adenovirus protects pigs from classical swine fever. Veterinary microbiology. 2001; 80(2); 101-119. [PubMed: 11295331].
Sainz et al., 2008: Sainz IF, Holinka LG, Lu Z, Risatti GR, Borca MV. Removal of a N-linked glycosylation site of classical swine fever virus strain Brescia Erns glycoprotein affects virulence in swine. Virology. 2008; 370(1); 122-129. [PubMed: 17904607].
Fernandez-Sainz et al., 2009: Fernandez-Sainz I, Holinka LG, Gavrilov BK, Prarat MV, Gladue D, Lu Z, Jia W, Risatti GR, Borca MV. Alteration of the N-linked glycosylation condition in E1 glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus strain Brescia alters virulence in swine. Virology. 2009; 386(1); 210-216. [PubMed: 19203774].
Hulst et al., 1993: Hulst MM, Westra DF, Wensvoort G, Moormann RJ. Glycoprotein E1 of hog cholera virus expressed in insect cells protects swine from hog cholera. Journal of virology. 1993; 67(9); 5435-5442. [PubMed: 8350404].
Maurer et al., 2005: Maurer R, Stettler P, Ruggli N, Hofmann MA, Tratschin JD. Oronasal vaccination with classical swine fever virus (CSFV) replicon particles with either partial or complete deletion of the E2 gene induces partial protection against lethal challenge with highly virulent CSFV. Vaccine. 2005; 23(25); 3318-3328. [PubMed: 15837238].
König et al., 1995: König M, Lengsfeld T, Pauly T, Stark R, Thiel HJ. Classical swine fever virus: independent induction of protective immunity by two structural glycoproteins. Journal of virology. 1995; 69(10); 6479-6486. [PubMed: 7666549].
König et al., 1995: König M, Lengsfeld T, Pauly T, Stark R, Thiel HJ. Classical swine fever virus: independent induction of protective immunity by two structural glycoproteins. Journal of virology. 1995; 69(10); 6479-6486. [PubMed: 7666549].
Tarradas et al., 2011: Tarradas J, Álvarez B, Fraile L, Rosell R, Muñoz M, Galindo-Cardiel I, Domingo M, Dominguez J, Ezquerra A, Sobrino F, Ganges L. Immunomodulatory effect of swine CCL20 chemokine in DNA vaccination against CSFV. Veterinary immunology and immunopathology. 2011; 142(3-4); 243-251. [PubMed: 21684019].
Sun et al., 2013: Sun Y, Tian DY, Li S, Meng QL, Zhao BB, Li Y, Li D, Ling LJ, Liao YJ, Qiu HJ. Comprehensive evaluation of the adenovirus/alphavirus-replicon chimeric vector-based vaccine rAdV-SFV-E2 against classical swine fever. Vaccine. 2013; 31(3); 538-544. [PubMed: 23153441].
Voigt et al., 2007: Voigt H, Merant C, Wienhold D, Braun A, Hutet E, Le Potier MF, Saalmüller A, Pfaff E, Büttner M. Efficient priming against classical swine fever with a safe glycoprotein E2 expressing Orf virus recombinant (ORFV VrV-E2). Vaccine. 2007; 25(31); 5915-5926. [PubMed: 17600594].
Wang et al., 2008: Wang YH, Li PH, Zhang MT, Zhang YM. [Construction of recombinant fowlpox virus expressing E0 gene of classical swine fever virus shimen strain and the animal immunity experiment]. Bing du xue bao = Chinese journal of virology / [bian ji, Bing du xue bao bian ji wei yuan hui]. 2008; 24(1); 59-63. [PubMed: 18320824].