VIOLIN Logo
VO Banner
Search: for Help
About
Introduction
Statistics
VIOLIN News
Your VIOLIN
Register or Login
Submission
Tutorial
Vaccine & Components
Vaxquery
Vaxgen
VBLAST
Protegen
VirmugenDB
DNAVaxDB
CanVaxKB
Vaxjo
Vaxvec
Vevax
Huvax
Vaccine Mechanisms
Vaximmutordb
Vaxism
Vaxar
Vaccine Literature
VO-SciMiner
Litesearch
Vaxmesh
Vaxlert
Vaccine Design
Vaxign
Community Efforts
Vaccine Ontology
ICoVax 2012
ICoVax 2013
Advisory Committee
Vaccine Society
Vaxperts
VaxPub
VaxCom
VaxLaw
VaxMedia
VaxMeet
VaxFund
VaxCareer
Data Exchange
V-Utilities
VIOLINML
Help & Documents
Publications
Documents
FAQs
Links
Acknowledgements
Disclaimer
Contact Us
UMMS Logo

Vaccine Comparison

Andes virus vaccine using adenovirus viral vector expressing ANDV NP Hantavirus DNA vaccine pWRG/HTN-M rVSVΔG-ANDV-GPC
Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0011561
  • Type: Recombinant vector vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Antigen: Andes virus nucleocapsid protein (ANDVsSgp1)
  • ANDVsSgp1 gene engineering:
    • Type: Recombinant vector construction
    • Description: Nonreplicating (E1− E3−) Ad vectors expressing ANDV proteins were constructed using the AdMax HI-IQ system (Microbix, Toronto, Canada). The ANDV GN, GC, GPC, and N open reading frames were PCR amplified from plasmids containing the appropriate cDNAs derived from a Chilean ANDV isolate, strain 9717869. AdEmpty was constructed using plasmid pDC316(io) containing no ANDV sequences. These pDC316(io)-based ANDV plasmids were cotransfected with plasmid pBHGloxΔE1,3Cre, containing the remainder of the Ad5 genomic plasmid, into 293 IQ cells. Supernatants were collected after 6 to 8 days, and the presence of Ad vectors expressing the ANDV proteins (designated AdN, AdGN, AdGC, and AdGPC) was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Ad vectors were plaque purified, propagated in large-scale infections in 293 IQ cells, and purified using standard CsCl gradient methods (Safronetz et al., 2009).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: Nonreplicating adenovirus (Ad) vectors
  • Immunization Route: Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004576
  • Type: DNA vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Hamsters
  • GP gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pWRG7077 (Hooper et al., 2001)
  • Immunization Route: Gene gun
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004662
  • Type: Recombinant vector vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species for Licensed Use: Baboon
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
Host Response Host Response Host Response

Hamster Response

  • Host Strain: Syrian gold
  • Vaccination Protocol: Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) (4- to 6-week-old males; Charles River, Pointe Claire, Canada) were group housed in microisolator units situated in the biosafety level 4 area of the National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada. Prior to vaccine experiments, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for i.p. injections of ANDV in hamsters was established by inoculating anesthetized animals with 0.8 to 80,000 FFU (using 10-fold dilutions) of ANDV. Hamsters were monitored twice daily for clinical signs of illness according to an approved scoring sheet (ruffled fur, lethargy, inappetence, and labored breathing). For vaccination, hamsters were anesthetized with isoflurane, a preimmunization blood sample was collected, and the animals were immunized with the Ad vectors using 108 (293 cell) PFU of each vector diluted in 100 μl phosphate-buffered saline at two sites in the hind-leg musculature (Safronetz et al., 2009).
  • Challenge Protocol: After 28 days, a second blood sample was collected and hamsters were challenged with ANDV by i.p. injection of 100 LD50s (equivalent to 154 FFU). Hamsters were examined twice daily for signs of illness. Survivors were monitored for 40 to 45 days and then anesthetized and exsanguinated via cardiac puncture (Safronetz et al., 2009).
  • Efficacy: Nonreplicating adenovirus (Ad) vectors that express Andes hantavirus (ANDV) nucleocapsid protein (AdN, ANDVsSgp1) or glycoproteins (AdG(N) and AdG(C)) were constructed . When administered once, all three Ad vectors, individually or in combination, elicited a robust immune response that protected Syrian hamsters from a lethal ANDV infection that mimics the pulmonary disease seen in humans. No vaccinated animal died, and there were no obvious clinical signs of disease (Safronetz et al., 2009).

Hamster Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Efficacy: All of the hamsters that were vaccinated with pWRG/HTN-M were protected against infection as defined by an absence of a postchallenge N-specific antibody response. In addition, the pre- and postchallenge PRNT titers differed by ≤4-fold. In contrast, all of the negative control hamsters, whether they were vaccinated with pWRG7077 or remained unvaccinated, were infected, as evidenced by the development of N-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies postchallenge (Hooper et al., 2001).

Hamster Response

  • Vaccination Protocol: Syrian hamsters were immunized with a single injection of VSVΔG/ANDVGPC (Brown et al., 2011).
  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000287
  • Challenge Protocol: After immunization, the hamsters were challenged at 28, 14, 7, or 3 days postimmunization with a lethal dose of ANDV (Brown et al., 2011).
  • Efficacy: The hamsters were fully protected against the disease; however, the mechanism of protection seems to differ depending on when the immunization occurs. Administration of the vaccine at 7 or 3 days before challenge also resulted in full protection but with no specific neutralizing humoral immune response, suggesting a possible role of innate responses in protection against challenge virus replication. Administration of the vaccine 24 h postchallenge was successful in protecting 90% of hamsters and again suggested the induction of a potent antiviral state by the recombinant vector as a potential mechanism (Brown et al., 2011).
References References References
Safronetz et al., 2009: Safronetz D, Hegde NR, Ebihara H, Denton M, Kobinger GP, St Jeor S, Feldmann H, Johnson DC. Adenovirus vectors expressing hantavirus proteins protect hamsters against lethal challenge with andes virus. Journal of virology. 2009; 83(14); 7285-7295. [PubMed: 19403663].
Hooper et al., 2001: Hooper JW, Custer DM, Thompson E, Schmaljohn CS. DNA vaccination with the Hantaan virus M gene protects Hamsters against three of four HFRS hantaviruses and elicits a high-titer neutralizing antibody response in Rhesus monkeys. Journal of virology. 2001; 75(18); 8469-8477. [PubMed: 11507192].
Brown et al., 2011: Brown KS, Safronetz D, Marzi A, Ebihara H, Feldmann H. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccine protects hamsters against lethal challenge with Andes virus. Journal of virology. 2011; 85(23); 12781-12791. [PubMed: 21917979].