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Vaccine Comparison

HBsAg Liposomal MTP-PE Vaccine Hepatitis B DNA vaccine pCMV-HBs encoding HBsAg Hepatitis B DNA vaccine PLGA–CTAB–DNA encoding the small envelope gene Hepatitis B DNA vaccine pRc/CMV-HBs(S) encoding HBsAg Hepatitis B DNA vaccine pS encoding major envelope proteins Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) with JVRS-1000
Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004239
  • Type: Subunit vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Antigen: HBsAg (Jain et al., 2009).
  • Adjuvant: MTP-PE Liposomes
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004358
  • Type: DNA vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Mouse
  • HbS gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Description: Vector pCMV expressed HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) (Davis et al., 1993).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pCMV (Davis et al., 1993)
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004352
  • Type: DNA vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Mouse
  • S gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Description: Vector pVAX(S) expressed the small envelope gene of HBV (He et al., 2005).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pVAX(S), derived from pVAX1 (He et al., 2005)
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004354
  • Type: DNA vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Mouse
  • HbS gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Description: This DNA vaccine expressed the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) (Khatri et al., 2008).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pCMV-S (Khatri et al., 2008)
  • Immunization Route: intranasal immunization
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004357
  • Type: DNA vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Mouse
  • Envelope proteins gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Description: Vector pcDNA3 expressed HBV major envelope proteins (Chow et al., 1998).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pcDNA3 (Chow et al., 1998)
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004260
  • Type: Subunit vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Antigen: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (Morrey et al., 2011).
  • Adjuvant: cationic liposome-DNA complex JVRS-100
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response Host Response

Mouse Response

  • Host Strain: Swiss
  • Vaccination Protocol: Alum-adsorbed antigen, liposomes (with or without MTP-PE and with or without MDP-GDP) with HBsAg antigen or liposomes (with or without MTP-PE and with or without MDP-GDP) without HBsAg antigen, in a dose equivalent to 10 μg HBsAg were injected intramuscularly and recombinant pure HBsAg was used as control. The immunomodulator doses given with each injection were 20 μg of MTP-PE and 10 μg of MDP-GDP. Secondary immunization was done after 4 weeks with the same formulations (Jain et al., 2009).
  • Immune Response: The incorporation of MTP-PE on the liposomal HBsAg increased the stimulation index (SI) four to five times as compared to plain HBsAg solution, and it also induced significantly higher Th1 cellular immune response with a predominant IFN-γ level (Jain et al., 2009).

Mouse Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000286
  • Immune Response: The serum concentration of secreted HBsAg after a one-time injection of DNA was sufficient to induce the production of anti-HBsAg 10 days after injection, and the antibody levels continued to increase for up to at least 60 days. Direct intramuscular injection of the plasmid vector encoding the HBsAg leads to secretion of the viral surface protein into the circulation, in the form of empty particles (Davis et al., 1993).
  • Efficacy: A level of 10 mlU/ml of anti-HBsAg antibody is recognized as being sufficient in humans to confer protection against natural Hepatitis B virus infection. This level of antibody response was achieved in 68% of mice vaccinated with the vaccine candidate at two weeks after vaccination. By 8 wks, all mice had >100 mIU anti-HBsAg in their sera, suggesting sufficient vaccine efficacy (Davis et al., 1993).

Mouse Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000286
  • Immune Response: PLGA–CTAB–DNA optimizes two key features during antigen presentation, controlled release and targeted delivery, which might be involved in the mechanisms of its augmented immunogenicity and enhanced immunoprotection (He et al., 2005)
  • Challenge Protocol: Challenge with transplanted HBsAg-expressing tumor cells (He et al., 2005).
  • Efficacy: Mice immunized with PLGA–CTAB–pVAX(S) (20 μg per mouse) or naked pVAX(S) (100 μg per mouse) after a challenge of transplanted HBsAg-expressing tumor cells showed weak protection efficacy, resulting in a final survival rate of 10% or 20% at week 15. However, mice immunized with PLGA–CTAB–pVAX(S) at the dose of 100 μg per mouse displayed a strong inhibition on tumor formation and a remarkable improvement in final survival rate (60%) (He et al., 2005).

Mouse Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000286
  • Immune Response: When mice are immunized with recombinant HBsAg, the main type of immune response generated is the antibody response. However, a Th1/CTL response was also elicited, which is important to facilitate eradication of HBV infection and can be utilized for therapeutic immunization of HBV chronic carriers (Khatri et al., 2008).
  • Efficacy: Nasal administration of nanoparticles resulted in serum anti-HBsAg titre that was less compared to that elicited by naked DNA and alum adsorbed HBsAg, but the mice were seroprotective within 2 weeks and the immunoglobulin level was above the clinically protective level (>10 mIU/ml) suggesting successful generation of systemic immunity. Levels of 1 and 10 mIU/ml are well-established standards for anti-HBs antibody levels in mice and humans, respectively and are considered sufficient to confer protection against the disease (Khatri et al., 2008).

Mouse Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000286
  • Immune Response: Coexpression of IL-2 and hepatitis B virus HBV^3 envelope protein within the same plasmid vector resulted in a dramatic increase in its ability to induce humoral and cellular immune responses to HBsAg. Also, the IL-2 adjuvant activity helps the HBV DNA vaccine elicit high anti-HBs titers in animals that usually fail to respond to rHBsAg vaccination (Chow et al., 1998)
  • Efficacy: Four of five mice immunized with pS + pcDNA3 and challenged with CT26/S showed an inhibition of tumor growth. The protective efficacy was dramatically increased when the IL-12 gene was coinjected with plasmid pS because tumor growth was significantly suppressed, and two of five mice remained tumor free up to 60 days following tumor challenge (Chow et al., 1998).

Mouse Response

  • Host Strain: C57BL/6
  • Vaccination Protocol: HBV transgenic mice were vaccinated with HBsAg (i.m., 5 μg), or HBsAg plus JVRS-100 (i.v., 10 μg) in female C57BL/6 mice (>6 weeks). Animals were treated on days 1, 22, and 43 (Morrey et al., 2011).
  • Immune Response: JVRS-100 combined with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) broke tolerance by stimulating significant B and T cell responses. The combination of HBsAg + JVRS-100 elicited a T cell response as indicated by increased levels of IFN-γ in splenocyte cell-culture supernatant (Morrey et al., 2011).
References References References References References References
Jain et al., 2009: Jain V, Vyas SP, Kohli DV. Well-defined and potent liposomal hepatitis B vaccines adjuvanted with lipophilic MDP derivatives. Nanomedicine : nanotechnology, biology, and medicine. 2009; 5(3); 334-344. [PubMed: 19523433].
Davis et al., 1993: Davis HL, Michel ML, Whalen RG. DNA-based immunization induces continuous secretion of hepatitis B surface antigen and high levels of circulating antibody. Human molecular genetics. 1993; 2(11); 1847-1851. [PubMed: 8281146].
 
Khatri et al., 2008: Khatri K, Goyal AK, Gupta PN, Mishra N, Vyas SP. Plasmid DNA loaded chitosan nanoparticles for nasal mucosal immunization against hepatitis B. International journal of pharmaceutics. 2008; 354(1-2); 235-241. [PubMed: 18182259].
Chow et al., 1998: Chow YH, Chiang BL, Lee YL, Chi WK, Lin WC, Chen YT, Tao MH. Development of Th1 and Th2 populations and the nature of immune responses to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccines can be modulated by codelivery of various cytokine genes. Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 1998; 160(3); 1320-1329. [PubMed: 9570550].
Morrey et al., 2011: Morrey JD, Motter NE, Chang S, Fairman J. Breaking B and T cell tolerance using cationic lipid-DNA complexes (CLDC) as a vaccine adjuvant with hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen in transgenic mice expressing HBV. Antiviral research. 2011; 90(3); 227-230. [PubMed: 21545812].