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Vaccine Comparison

rMV- WNV West Nile virus C protein mutant vaccine West Nile virus DNA vaccine pCBWN encoding prM and E
Vaccine Information Vaccine Information Vaccine Information
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004712
  • Type: Recombinant vector vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species for Licensed Use: Baboon
  • Preparation: A recombinant MV vaccine expressing the secreted form of WNV envelope glycoprotein (Brandler and Tangy, 2013).
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0002998
  • Type: Live, attenuated vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Mouse
  • C protein gene engineering:
    • Type: Gene mutation
    • Description: This C protein is from West Nile virus (Schlick et al., 2010).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Immunization Route: Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.)
  • Vaccine Ontology ID: VO_0004415
  • Type: DNA vaccine
  • Status: Research
  • Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model: Mouse, horse
  • E protein gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Description: Vector pCBINT expressed WNV E protein (Davis et al., 2001).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • PrM gene engineering:
    • Type: DNA vaccine construction
    • Description: Vector pCBINT expressed WNV prM protein (Davis et al., 2001).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.
  • Vector: pCBINT (Davis et al., 2001)
  • Immunization Route: Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
Host Response Host Response Host Response

Mouse Response

  • Vaccination Protocol: Mice were immunized with varying doses of MVSchw-sEWN (Brandler and Tangy, 2013).
  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Challenge Protocol: Mice were challenged with doses ranging from 100 to 100,000 focus-forming units of IS98-ST1 WNV (Brandler and Tangy, 2013).
  • Efficacy: A single administration of a recombinant MV vaccine expressing the secreted form of WNV envelope glycoprotein elicited protective immunity in mice as early as two weeks after immunization (Brandler and Tangy, 2013).

Mouse Response

  • Persistence: A C protein mutant is attenuated in mice (Schlick et al., 2010).
  • Efficacy: A C protein mutant protects mice from challenge with wild type West Nile virus (Schlick et al., 2010).
  • Host IgG response
    • Description: WNV specific IgG titers were also determined 4 weeks post-challenge. Titers had generally increased to values of 104–105, with the more pronounced increases observed in mice that had been immunized with lower doses of vaccine strains. All animals inoculated with any of the virus mutants seroconverted, whereas serum samples of animals that had received medium alone showed no WNV specific antibody response. A statistically significant increase in IgG over control mice was observed (Schlick et al., 2010).
    • Detailed Gene Information: Click Here.

Mouse Response

  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0000286
  • Immune Response: Recombinant plasmid-transformed COS-1 cells expressed and secreted high levels of WN virus prM and E proteins into the culture medium (Davis et al., 2001).
  • Efficacy: The lowest dose tested (0.1 μg of DNA per animal) is sufficient to induce complete protective immunity by our vaccine in mice. It was evident that the presence of WN virus antibody correlated with protective immunity, since all mice immunized with WN virus DNA remained healthy after virus challenge. All control mice developed symptoms of central nervous system infection 4 to 6 days later and died an average of 6.9 and 7.4 days after i.p. or infected-mosquito challenge, respectively (Davis et al., 2001).
References References References
Brandler and Tangy, 2013: Brandler S, Tangy F. Vaccines in development against West Nile virus. Viruses. 2013; 5(10); 2384-2409. [PubMed: 24084235].
Schlick et al., 2010: Schlick P, Kofler RM, Schittl B, Taucher C, Nagy E, Meinke A, Mandl CW. Characterization of West Nile virus live vaccine candidates attenuated by capsid deletion mutations. Vaccine. 2010; 28(36); 5903-5909. [PubMed: 20600500].
Davis et al., 2001: Davis BS, Chang GJ, Cropp B, Roehrig JT, Martin DA, Mitchell CJ, Bowen R, Bunning ML. West Nile virus recombinant DNA vaccine protects mouse and horse from virus challenge and expresses in vitro a noninfectious recombinant antigen that can be used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Journal of virology. 2001; 75(9); 4040-4047. [PubMed: 11287553].