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Chlamydia trachomatis

Table of Contents
  1. General Information
    1. NCBI Taxonomy ID
    2. Disease
    3. Introduction
    4. Host Ranges and Animal Models
    5. Host Protective Immunity
  2. Vaccine Related Pathogen Genes
    1. ompA (Protective antigen)
  3. Vaccine Information
    1. C. trachomatis DNA vaccine pWRG7079::MOMP
    2. rVCG- Chlamydia-cholera
    3. rVCG- MOMP/HSV-2-gD
    4. Synthetic OMP1 Vaccine
  4. References
I. General Information
1. NCBI Taxonomy ID:
813
2. Disease:
Chlamydia
3. Introduction
Sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis infection is a widespread public health concern because of its prevalence and potentially devastating reproductive consequences, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), infertility, and ectopic pregnancy. Although the pathologic consequences of infection are well established, the mechanism(s) of chlamydia-induced tissue damage are not fully understood (Darville and Hiltke, 2010).
4. Host Ranges and Animal Models
Chlamydia infects humans and there are established animal models in mice and guinea pigs (Darville and Hiltke, 2010).
5. Host Protective Immunity
Mouse and guinea pig models show that the response to primary chlamydial in fection occurs within 1–2 days of infection and is characterized by mucosal infiltration with neutrophils and modest numbers of monocytes. Neutrophils are recruited in large numbers to the site of infection and are capable of killing accessible elementary bodies. Later, T cells accumulate at the site of chlamydial infection and play a critical role in controlling the infection (Darville and Hiltke, 2010).
1. ompA
  • Gene Name : ompA
  • Sequence Strain (Species/Organism) : Chlamydia trachomatis serovar E
  • NCBI Protein GI : 129149
  • Other Database IDs : CDD:216427
  • Taxonomy ID : 813
  • Gene Strand (Orientation) : ?
  • Protein Name : Major outer membrane porin, serovar E
  • Protein Length : 393
  • Protein Note : MOMP
  • Protein Sequence : Show Sequence
    >gi|129149|sp|P17451.1|MOMPE_CHLTH RecName: Full=Major outer membrane porin, serovar E; Short=MOMP; Flags: Precursor
    MKKLLKSVLVFAALSSASSLQALPVGNPAEPSLMIDGILWEGFGGDPCDPCTTWCDAISMRMGYYGDFVF
    DRVLKTDVNKEFQMGDKPTSTTGNATAPTTLTARENPAYGRHMQDAEMFTNAACMALNIWDRFDVFCTLG
    ASSGYLKGNSASFNLVGLFGDNENQSTVKTNSVPNMSLDQSVVELYTDTAFSWSVGARAALWECGCATLG
    ASFQYAQSKPKVEELNVLCNAAEFTINKPKGYVGQEFPLALIAGTDAATGTKDASIDYHEWQASLALSYR
    LNMFTPYIGVKWSRASFDADTIRIAQPKSATAIFDTTTLNPTIAGAGDVKASAEGQLGDTMQIVSLQLNK
    MKSRKSCGIAVGTTIVDADKYAVTVETRLIDERAAHVNAQFRF
  • Molecule Role : Protective antigen
  • Related Vaccine(s): C. trachomatis DNA vaccine pWRG7079::MOMP
III. Vaccine Information
1. C. trachomatis DNA vaccine pWRG7079::MOMP
a. Vaccine Ontology ID:
VO_0004554
b. Type:
DNA vaccine
c. Status:
Research
d. Host Species as Laboratory Animal Model:
Pig
e. Antigen
ompA of C. trachomatis serovar E strain 468 (Schautteet et al., 2011)
f. Gene Engineering of ompA
  • Type: DNA vaccine construction
  • Description:
  • Detailed Gene Information: Click here.
g. Vector:
pWRG7079 (Schautteet et al., 2011)
h. Immunization Route
Intravaginal injection
i. Pig Response
  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Efficacy: A good level of protection against C. trachomatis genital infection was observed in the immunized group. This group had no or only mild macroscopic lesions in comparison with the control group. The infection was mainly localized in the lower genital tract while in the placebo-primed group, C. trachomatis was spread throughout the lower and upper genital tract. The scores for chlamydial presence were significantly higher for the corpus uteri, the uterine tubes and the oviducts of the control group. No replication was detected outside the urogenital tract, which is in accordance with the literature. Induction of immune mechanisms that limited infection and replication also resulted in a decreased shedding by the vaccinated pigs in comparison with the control ones. Significant differences were seen at some time points from 10 days post infection until euthanasia (Schautteet et al., 2011).
2. rVCG- Chlamydia-cholera
a. Vaccine Ontology ID:
VO_0004720
b. Type:
Recombinant vector vaccine
c. Status:
Research
d. Host Species for Licensed Use:
Baboon
e. Preparation
A multisubunit vaccine candidate co-expressing the serovar D-derived Porin B and polymorphic membrane protein-D proteins of Chlamydia trachomatis (Eko et al., 2011; Chen et al., 1998).
f. Immunization Route
Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
g. Mouse Response
  • Vaccination Protocol: Mice were immunized with rVCG constructs (Eko et al., 2011).
  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Efficacy: All vaccinated mice responded with a significant rise in vibriocidal antibody titer, the surrogate marker for protection in cholera (Eko et al., 2011).
3. rVCG- MOMP/HSV-2-gD
a. Vaccine Ontology ID:
VO_0004722
b. Type:
Recombinant vector vaccine
c. Status:
Research
d. Host Species for Licensed Use:
Baboon
e. Preparation
A bivalent combination vaccine formulation comprising rVCG expressing chlamydial MOMP and HSV-2 glycoprotein D (Macmillan et al., 2007).
f. Immunization Route
Intramuscular injection (i.m.)
g. Mouse Response
  • Vaccination Protocol: Mice were immunized with the combination vaccine that elicited secretory IgA and IgG2a antibodies to both chlamydial and HSV-2 antigens in serum and vaginal secretions (Macmillan et al., 2007).
  • Vaccine Immune Response Type: VO_0003057
  • Challenge Protocol: Immunized mice then experienced a genital challenge with high doses of live Chlamydia and HSV-2 (Macmillan et al., 2007).
  • Efficacy: Mice immunized with the combination vaccine were prophylactically protected (Macmillan et al., 2007).
4. Synthetic OMP1 Vaccine
a. Vaccine Ontology ID:
VO_0004240
b. Type:
Subunit vaccine
c. Status:
Research
d. Antigen
Lipidic amino acid-based synthetic peptides derived from the variable domains (VD) of Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane protein 1 (Zhong et al., 1993).
e. Adjuvant: NAGO
f. Immunization Route
subcutaneous injection
g. Mouse Response
  • Vaccination Protocol: 50 μg of peptide was injected subcutaneously with NAGO in PBS into the tail base, and was repeated at 14 day intervals (Zhong et al., 1993).
  • Immune Response: NAGO elicited an antibody response similar to that in mice immunized with CFA (Zhong et al., 1993).
IV. References
1. Chen et al., 1998: Chen I, Finn TM, Yanqing L, Guoming Q, Rappuoli R, Pizza M. A recombinant live attenuated strain of Vibrio cholerae induces immunity against tetanus toxin and Bordetella pertussis tracheal colonization factor. Infection and immunity. 1998; 66(4); 1648-1653. [PubMed: 9529093].
2. Darville and Hiltke, 2010: Darville T, Hiltke TJ. Pathogenesis of genital tract disease due to Chlamydia trachomatis. The Journal of infectious diseases. 2010; 201 Suppl 2; S114-125. [PubMed: 20524234].
3. Eko et al., 2011: Eko FO, Okenu DN, Singh UP, He Q, Black C, Igietseme JU. Evaluation of a broadly protective Chlamydia-cholera combination vaccine candidate. Vaccine. 2011; 29(21); 3802-3810. [PubMed: 21421002].
4. Macmillan et al., 2007: Macmillan L, Ifere GO, He Q, Igietseme JU, Kellar KL, Okenu DM, Eko FO. A recombinant multivalent combination vaccine protects against Chlamydia and genital herpes. FEMS immunology and medical microbiology. 2007; 49(1); 46-55. [PubMed: 17094789].
5. Schautteet et al., 2011: Schautteet K, Stuyven E, Beeckman DS, Van Acker S, Carlon M, Chiers K, Cox E, Vanrompay D. Protection of pigs against Chlamydia trachomatis challenge by administration of a MOMP-based DNA vaccine in the vaginal mucosa. Vaccine. 2011; 29(7); 1399-1407. [PubMed: 21195805].
6. Zhong et al., 1993: Zhong G, Toth I, Reid R, Brunham RC. Immunogenicity evaluation of a lipidic amino acid-based synthetic peptide vaccine for Chlamydia trachomatis. Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950). 1993; 151(7); 3728-3736. [PubMed: 7690812].